Quick Post: Press Release for 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans

EMBARGOED UNTIL 10:00 AM EST, JANUARY 31, 2011

 

USDA and HHS Announce New Dietary Guidelines to Help Americans Make Healthier Food Choices and Confront Obesity Epidemic

WASHINGTON, Jan. 31, 2011 — Agriculture Secretary TomVilsack and Secretary of the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) Kathleen Sebelius today announced the release of the 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans, the federal government’s evidence-based nutritional guidance to promote health, reduce the risk of chronic diseases, and reduce the prevalence of overweight and obesity through improved nutrition and physical activity.

Because more than one-third of children and more than two-thirds of adults in the United States are overweight or obese, the 7th edition of Dietary Guidelines for Americans places stronger emphasis on reducing calorie consumption and increasing physical activity.

“The 2010 Dietary Guidelines are being released at a time when the majority of adults and one in three children is overweight or obese and this is a crisis that we can no longer ignore,” said Secretary Vilsack.  “These new and improved dietary recommendations give individuals the information to make thoughtful choices of healthier foods in the right portions and to complement those choices with physical activity.  The bottom line is that most Americans need to trim our waistlines to reduce the risk of developing diet-related chronic disease. Improving our eating habits is not only good for every individual and family, but also for our country.”

The new 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans focus on balancing calories with physical activity, and encourage Americans to consume more healthy foods like vegetables, fruits, whole grains, fat-free and low-fat dairy products, and seafood, and to consume lesssodium, saturated and trans fats, added sugars, and refined grains.

“Helping Americans incorporate these guidelines into their everyday lives is important to improving the overall health of the American people,” said HHS Secretary Sebelius. “The new Dietary Guidelines provide concrete action steps to help people live healthier, more physically active and longer lives.”

The 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans include 23 Key Recommendations for the general population and six additional Key Recommendations for specific population groups, such as women who are pregnant. Key Recommendations are the most important messages within the Guidelines in terms of their implications for improving public health.  The recommendations are intended as an integrated set of advice to achieve an overall healthy eating pattern.  To get the full benefit, all Americans should carry out the Dietary Guidelines recommendations in their entirety.

More consumer-friendly advice and tools, including a next generation Food Pyramid, will be released by USDA and HHS in the coming months. Below is a preview of some of the tips that will be provided to help consumers translate the Dietary Guidelines into their everyday lives:

  • Enjoy your food, but eat less.
  • Avoid oversized portions.
  • Make half your plate fruits and vegetables.
  • Switch to fat-free or low-fat (1%) milk.
  • Compare sodium in foods like soup, bread, and frozen meals – and choose the foods with lower numbers.
  • Drink water instead of sugary drinks.

This edition of the Dietary Guidelines comes at a critical juncture for America’s health and prosperity.   By adopting the recommendations in the Dietary Guidelines, Americans can live healthier lives and contribute to a lowering of health-care costs, helping to strengthen America’s long-term economic competitiveness and overall productivity.

USDA and HHS have conducted this latest review of the scientific literature, and have developed and issued the 7th edition of the Dietary Guidelines for Americans in a joint effort that is mandated by Congress. The Guidelines form the basis of nutrition education programs, Federal nutrition assistance programs such as school meals programs and Meals on Wheels programs for seniors, and dietary advice provided by health professionals.

The Dietary Guidelines, based on the most sound scientific information, provide authoritative advice for people 2 years and older about how proper dietary habits can promote health and reduce risk for major chronic diseases.

The Dietary Guidelines aid policymakers in designing and implementing nutrition-related programs. They also provide education and health professionals, such as nutritionists, dietitians, and health educators with a compilation of the latest science-based recommendations. A table with key consumer behaviors and potential strategies for professionals to use in implementing the Dietary Guidelines is included in the appendix.

The 2010 Dietary Guidelines is available at www.dietaryguidelines.gov.

For more information on dietary guidelines, see www.health.gov/dietaryguidelines and www.healthfinder.gov/prevention


USDA is an equal opportunity provider, employer and lender. To file a complaint of discrimination, write: USDA, Director, Office of Civil Rights, 1400 Independence Ave., SW, Washington, DC 20250-9410 or call (800) 795-3272 (voice), or (202) 720-6382 (TDD).

Dr. Oz Viewing and Twitter Party!

January 3, 2011 is a day you wanna mark down, sit down at a computer and turn on your TV. Cause we are gonna blow up Twitter with a fun live chat during the Dr. Oz episode “11 Weeks to Move it and Lose it”. Check time and channel by zip code.

This one of–a–kind online initiative will provide customized tools to knock off the pounds and transform people’s bodies and lives by giving participants their very own personal trainer and their own individually tailored weight loss plan (a value of $99 a month) absolutely free. During the show, Dr. Oz will
go through the easy step-by-step process of how and when to sign up for the program plus reap incredible benefits and giveaways.

Did someone say incentives???

To help kick off the “11 Weeks to Move It and Lose It” campaign, THE DR. OZ SHOW is partnering with the Nike SPARQ Training Network (NSTN), selected based on their unique expertise and knowledge in the health and fitness field. This team of experts (11 trainers and 11 health/nutrition experts) will be able to provide guidance and motivation, results–focused webcasts, exercise videos, behavior modification tips and answer health and fitness questions all at the touch of a mouse. (have not been able to find a link on the experts yet). On the website www.doctoroz.com, participants can track their progress and food intake with these unique tools:

  • Food logging – Participants can enter virtually any food from a database over 70,000 foods (even from popular restaurants) to keep track of calorie and nutrient intake as well as receive suggested lifestyle menus to help plan out meals.
  • Setting weight loss goal /tracking – In order to help participants determine a realistic goal for 11 weeks, a customized calendar will monitor progress and set goals with reminders of where you need to be every day based on height, weight, BMI, age, and lifestyle.
  • Health assessment – Participants can take a quiz to evaluate diet and exercise based on current health.
  • Weight loss community – Participants will get the chance to talk to others on the plan and gain support as they work through the challenges. People can also see real–time updates on their progress and get tips and professional advice from the NSTN for motivation.
  • Exercise – Videos and webcasts will help participants lose the pounds and get them on the road to healthier living.
  • Product – Participants will receive recommendations from the NSTN with regard to specific products that will support their chosen exercise programs.

Tweet with Us (and Fit Bottomed Girls)

Whether you are already a guru, in the middle of your journey, or feel inspired to start changes in 2011 — your thoughts matter. Use your voice on Twitter. Watch with us and send your tweets out there to share your thoughts on the program. Let’s use #DrOzMILI (Dr. Oz Move It Lose It) as the hash tag. Share your blog posts too. Will you try the program? Why/why not?

Follow @ScritchfieldRD and @FitBottomedGirl and let us know you will be on the Twitter chat on January 3rd!

11 Weeks to Move It Lose It

Viewers can sign up for the “11 Weeks to to Move It or Lose It” program simply by going to www.doctoroz.com. Enrollment is available free of charge for the entire 11 weeks. THE DR. OZ SHOW will be monitoring progress of individuals and exploring various components of the 11 week program throughout January and February.

Knowledge Doesn’t Necessarily Lead to Smart Choices

This is a direct line from my “Nurture Principles – find wellness within” keynote. I can honestly say that there are things I know I should do but don’t. So big deal we’re human, right? Well… not so fast. I think the disconnect here is that we don’t think about the long-term impact of our day-to-day choices. We’re just getting through the day. Hence, we easily say we don’t have time, motivation, or money to exercise. We not only need to know our DAILY CHOICES MATTER, but we also need to BELIEVE that our ACTIONS can make a difference!

I was reading this MSNBC article about a recent survey that demonstrated our lifestyle choices don’t match our fears.

The Bupa Health Pulse survey found that four in five, or 80 percent, say they are worried about developing chronic diseases.

According to the Geneva-based World Health Organisation, diabetes and cardiovascular diseases accounted for almost a third of all deaths around the world in 2005.

Nearly half of the 12,000 people questioned across 12 countries admitted they only exercise for an hour a week or less.

When asked to name their biggest barrier to making healthier lifestyle choices, 24 percent of those surveyed cited lack of time, almost a fifth cited motivation and 14 percent blamed the expense.

“We know from research that exercise is one of the most effective lifestyle changes you can make to reduce your risk of developing long-term conditions,” said Julien Forder, a senior research fellow at the LSE, who worked on the report. “Nearly a third of cardiovascular disease and more than a quarter of diabetes could be avoided if everyone started to exercise.”

When asked about the fears of developing chronic diseases, a third of respondents were most worried about cancer compared to only 11 percent being most worried about heart disease, and only 8 percent about diabetes.

(Reporting by Kate Kelland, editing by Paul Casciato)

It seems to me that they are “worried” but not that worried. They don’t want to face it right now. Too much “else” going on. Well, if not now, then when? Hopefully it won’t be too late. Because you can’t wish away years of unhealthy behavior. What are YOU doing to take care of yourself? What would you say to people working on taking that first BIG step?

Polycystic Ovary Syndrome: Diet Therapy

Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is the most common female hormonal disorder, affecting approximately 5%-10% of all females. PCOS is a hormonal disorder that involves multiple tissues and organ systems within the body, and is believed to be fundamentally caused by insensitivity to the hormone insulin Diet and Nutrition play a large role in treatment of this disorder, and food is medicine in this disease state. Registered Dietitians can help to maintain weight, and alleviate some of the symptoms by adjusting diet and lifestyle choices. Here are some important things to remember if you have been diagnosed with PCOS:

Signs and Symptoms:

According to MayoClinic the symptoms often begin soon after menarche, but it can also develop later in life. Infrequent or prolonged menstrual periods, excess hair growth, acne, and obesity can all occur in women with polycystic ovary syndrome. Additionally, PCOS is also the most common cause of female infertility.

Insulin resistance occurs frequently in those with PCOS, meaning the body cannot use insulin effectively to regulate blood sugar. This can result in high blood sugar and type 2 diabetes. The long-term complications are quite serious and include heart disease and stroke. Compared with women of a similar age who don’t have polycystic ovary syndrome, women with PCOS are more likely to be overweight or obese.

When to see a doctor

Early diagnosis and treatment of polycystic ovary syndrome may help reduce your risk of long-term complications. Talk with your doctor if you have menstrual irregularities — such as infrequent periods, prolonged periods or no menstrual periods — and have excess hair on your face and body or acne. Regular checkups are key to timely diagnosis. Find a medical professional that specializes in PCOS here

Treatment:

There is no cure to PCOS, but there are methods to control it and reduce the risk including:

  • Weight control
  • regular exercise
  • healthy diet
  • not smoking

Lifestyle modification through diet is an effective and important part of the treatment for PCOS. There is no doubt that making changes to your eating can result in weight loss, improved fertility, and overall improvement in health. Obesity makes insulin resistance worse, and weight loss can reduce both insulin and androgen levels and restore ovulation. Exercise also helps lower blood sugar levels, so should be part of your daily regime.  A Registered Dietitian would be able to help you create a meal plan for optimal health; find one near you!

While PCOS is a serious condition, through behavior and lifestyle modifications the symptoms can be treated and reduced. Registered Dietitians are here to help you become a healthier you! Newly diagnosed? Check out the MayoClinic or PCOS Support pages.

Do you or anyone you know have PCOS? What has been some of your experiences and what role did you find diet played?

Food and Health Survey Results Indicate a Change

’77’ seems to be a key number in weight management, according to the 2010 Food and Health Survey.  77% of Americans are currently attempting to lose or maintain their post weight loss bodies.  However, another 77% report not meeting the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ Physical Activity Guideline.

The Food and Health Survey’s goal is to assess the current population’s vision on eating and physical activity habits.  The organization responsible for producing the survey is the Nutrition and Food Safety at the International Food Information Council Foundation. The foundation’s senior vice president ,Marianne Smith Edge, MS, RD, LD, FADA, states that Americans continue to hear about the importance of overall health, but from a large variety of sources.  She states that there are organizations all over, from the White House’s Let’s Move campaign to similar smaller programs, which are all concentrating on reducing the obesity epidemic. But in order to do that, you have to take baby steps.

Edge is referring to proper calculations of ‘calories in’ versus ‘calories out’.  The same survey indicated that 58% of the population does not concern themselves with the balance of calories, therefore eliminating a key weight loss or weight management tool.  Another issue is the public’s estimation of those calories.  Unless you are relying on a very up to date program, it’s possible to get incorrect numbers.  In addition, portion size, and keeping track of snacks throughout the day need to be taken into account. Everything adds up.

Here are some more survey stats:

  • 53% of the population is more concerned with sodium intake in their diets
  • 72% are consuming more fiber
  • 73% are consuming more grains
  • 64% were concerned about money issues with foods while in 2010 it increased to 73%.
  • When purchasing 86% of individuals buy because of taste, with price in second, health factor at 58% and convenience at 55%.
  • Overall, 73% of Americans are pleased with the types of foods they have offered at their local supermarkets.

For more information about the foundation or the survey, visit www.foodinsight.org.