Zespri Kiwifruit Sunrise Smoothie Bowl #Recipe


Sunrise Kiwi Smoothie Bowl

Breakfast doesn’t have to be be boring. Smoothie bowls are a great way to get the refreshing taste and flavor you get from a smoothie, but with a little added texture. This smoothie bowl recipe is packed with nutrients and flavor. One kiwifruit alone has more vitamin C than an orange and as much potassium as a medium banana. So get blending and enjoy this easy breakfast in less than 10 minutes. You’re welcome, hungry people of the world.

Sunrise Smoothie Bowl
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This refreshing blend of fruity summer flavors is a great way to spice up your morning routine. Its packed with calcium, potassium, and many other important nutrients so you can start your day energized!
  • 2 Zespri® SunGold Kiwifruit (one peeled and blended; one sliced into ¼” chunks for topping)
  • 1 large banana – chopped, frozen
  • ⅓ cup orange juice
  • ½ cup plain yogurt
  • 2 tablespoons Chia seeds (the chia helps to thicken the mixture, like a pudding texture)
  • 4 tablespoons granola
  • 2 tablespoons toasted coconut
  • 2 tablespoons nuts, chopped
  • 2 tablespoons mint, chopped
  1. Slice kiwifruit into halves and spoon the fruit out.
  2. Reserve one kiwifruit, chopped into ¼” chunks for topping.
  3. Add 1 kiwifruit, banana, orange juice, yogurt, and chia seeds to a blender and blend until creamy and smooth (the mixture will be thick).
  4. Per serving bowl, place half the mixture at the bottom of the bowl, add 2 tablespoons granola, 1 tablespoon each of toasted coconut, nuts, and mint.
  5. Leftovers can be kept in the refrigerator for up to 1-2 days.

Disclosure: Zespri is a client of mine, but they did not compensate me to create this recipe or write this blog post. 

DIY Freezer Smoothie Bags + Recipe




DIY Smoothie Bag

I make smoothies almost every day, for breakfast, exercise pre- or post-fuel, or as an after-school snack for my kids. But when I’m trying to juggle work, being a mom, and all the craziness life throws my way, even the simple task of throwing together a quick smoothie can seem overwhelming. So, what’s a busy mom to do? Prep ahead of time, of course! Prepping and assembling smoothie ingredients in smoothie bags ahead of time can make all the difference in the world between getting a nourishing, frosty smoothie in your belly STAT versus ravenously grabbing whatever food you can get your hands on.

In just about ten minutes, you can get smoothies for an entire week prepped and ready to go! Assemble them ahead of time and then keep in the fridge or freezer to pull out whenever you want them. Prepare them just like you would if you were making the smoothie right then and there. Here’s how to make it happen:

Chop and Prep Fruits and Veggies

  • Use whatever you like/have on hand. I like bananas, kiwifruit, blueberries, tart cherries, cranberries, kale, spinach, avocado, etc. Seriously, pretty much anything goes. Chop into small pieces, if necessary, and place in small, sealable plastic bags.
  • If you have any fruits or veggies that are about to turn, these smoothie bags are a perfect way to reduce food waste! Just be sure you freeze these ones when they’re assembled!

Add Extras

  • Toss whatever add-ins you like into bag with your produce. Nut butter, Greek yogurt, and protein powder are all good options. I also like cinnamon, vanilla, and other spices to enhance the flavor.

Seal and store

  • Roll up the bag to squeeze all the air out, and then create a tight seal to keep ingredients fresh. If you’re freezing your bags, use a freezer bag for optimal freshness.
  • If you prefer reusable containers, fill these up as much as possible to reduce amount of air in the container
  • Store in fridge or freeze them. The freezer will definitely keep everything fresh for a longer time, but be sure to pull them out the night before you want to use them to keep your blender happy.

Blend and Enjoy

  • Pop the contents of the bag in your blender. Add liquid to make it smooth (your preferred milk, water, coconut water, etc.) and ice to get it nice and cold, and blend as usual

Like I said, these are no-brainers that you really cannot mess up. Just about anything can go in a smoothie. Below is one of my tried and true recipes, but feel free to play around with it and find your own personal faves!

Banana Split Smoothie
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It's dessert in a cup! This creamy blend of cool sweetness delivers a heap of nutrition and fiber, making it a perfect option to satisfy that sweet tooth or refuel after a workout.
Recipe type: Smoothie
Serves: 3
  • ½ cup pineapple (fresh, frozen, or canned)
  • ½ cup of strawberries (fresh or frozen)
  • 1 ripe banana, sliced
  • 1 cup plain or Greek-style yogurt
  • 1 tablespoon chocolate sauce
  • ⅓ cup rolled oats
  • 1 cup ice
  • ½ cup your favorite milk
  • 1 T peanuts, crushed, for garnish (optional)
  1. Place all ingredients except ice, milk and peanuts, in bag and freeze or refrigerate until ready to use. Place bag contents in blender, add milk and ice, and blend until desired consistency is reached. Top each with crushed peanuts, if desired.
  2. *Add spinach, kale, or avocado to “green” up this recipe


Hooray! Get My Feel Great Guide Today (It’s Free)

Rebecca Scritchfield's Feel Great GuideI just launched my FREE Feel Great Guide, which I made to help you get healthier and happier. The guide has tips on food, fitness, fun, sleep, and kindness! (Plus a free daily health and happiness journal and links to some of my favorite resources.)

The advice I give is based on how I live my life, what I share with clients, the kind of stuff I’m teaching my own daughters. (They’re still very young, but you’re never to young to “S-L-Y” Start Loving Yourself.)

I believe that health and happiness go hand-in-hand. When you make choices that are good-for-you and enjoyable, you’re more likely to repeat them. Attitude is everything and you don’t have to be miserable or go to extremes to work on a healthier, happier you.

I share my tips on how to make small changes in your life to start to become your favorite version of yourself.

This FREE Feel Great Guide is so easy to get! Just enter your email at the top of my website to get your FREE guide today!

What is your favorite health and happiness tip? Share below!

Try This: “I had a long day” Recipe Stuffed Sweet Potato


This sweet potato recipe is easy to make after a long day where all you want to do is sit down and relax. This spin on a favorite comfort food could be the main course of your dinner or split between the family for a tasty side dish.

When I eat this as a meal, I add chopped chicken or beef for a boost of protein and satisfaction. Anything goes – Use what works for you.

Stuffed Sweet Potato
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Serves 1
Serves: 25 min
  • 1 Sweet potato
  • 2 tablespoons milk
  • 1 teaspoon butter
  • ¼ cup of dark greens (spinach, kale, chard etc. )
  • ⅛ cup finely chopped carrots
  • ½ chicken breast, cooked and chopped (optional)
  • ¼ cup shredded cheese (I love cheddar!)
  1. Heat oven to 375 degrees.
  2. Scrub sweet potato and cut a ½ inch deep line around the middle.
  3. Microwave for 7-10 minutes, or until cooked all the way through.
  4. Scoop out flesh, and leave the skins to the side (don’t throw them away!).
  5. Mash the sweet potato in a bowl with milk and butter.
  6. Stir in greens, carrots, chicken, and half of the shredded cheese.
  7. Put the filling back into the sweet potato skins, and put on a tray or in tinfoil (I find it is more stable if I make a boat out of tinfoil for the sweet potato!).
  8. Sprinkle remaining cheese on top, and bake until the cheese on top is golden, which takes about 8-12 minutes!
  9. Enjoy!


What are your favorite foods to make after a long day? Share below in the comments.

3 Dieting Myths I No Longer Believe After Reading ‘Beyond a Shadow of a Diet’

By: Sarah Bousquet, American University student and Intern

beyond a shadow of a diet

I recently read ‘Beyond a Shadow of a Diet’, by Judith Matz and Ellen Frankel.  This book discusses the negative impact of dieting on our society and why dieting does the opposite of the intended goal of losing weight.  The authors also focus on how weight and BMI are not accurate representations of health and wellness, and what we as individuals and as a society can do to better understand our health and our bodies.  There were many myths about dieting and weight that were debunked throughout the book, but these three stuck out to me the most.


Myth 1: Diets help you lose weight

  • As the book proves, dieting has the opposite affect on your body.  Through dieting, certain foods that are deemed ‘bad’ by our society become forbidden, and therefore the dieter will have an increased desire to eat these foods. Although dieting can initially help you lose weight, the authors show that after about 2 years approximately 95% of dieters gain the weight back, or enter into a ‘yo-yo’ system of dieting which leads to gaining and losing weight over and over again.  This is detrimental to the health because when dieting the body will begin to burn muscle and fat, so when the dieter gains the weight back they will gain it in fat and lose overall muscle mass, and therefore their health will be in a worse state than at the beginning.

Myth 2: BMI is an accurate depicter of health

  • BMI was originally used to show the weight and general health of the population, not the health of the individuals.  BMI standards for overweight and obese has changed in 1998, creating a new basis for what is considered ‘normal BMI’.  BMI is not an indicator of health, only an indicator of a person’s overall body mass index.  Since BMI is not an indicator of health, the number of your BMI is not nearly as important as treating your body right and, as the book states, being fit is much more important than losing weight or being thin.  There is no correct body shape or weight, and, according to the authors, “a range of female body shapes celebrate life, renewal, and growth”.

Myth 3: Weight is an indicator of health, and obesity causes health problems and diseases.

  • Weight actually has little to do with fitness and health, and therefore is not an accurate indicator of health. Everyones bodies are different, and people who are considered ‘overweight’ can be much healthier than people who are considered ‘normal’. The idea that obesity can cause health problems and diseases are not founded on facts, and studies that were done on obesity tended to be biased, because the doctors who have run those studies in the past were found to work for pharmaceutical companies that were releasing weight loss drugs.

The book ‘Beyond a Shadow of a Diet’ is working to end the stigma that is associated to weight and end the weight bias.  They recognize that body shape, size and weight are not evidence of any particular way of eating or level of health.  They are trying to show that mindfulness, or bringing awareness to your own health and eating without judgement or expectation will lead to self acceptance.